Bleeding Master Cylinder Chevy Tahoe GM Trucks

Bleeding Master Cylinder Chevy Tahoe GM Trucks

I always like to say that I’m the guy that teaches you how to do stuff by not showing you what to do but what not to do. And in my infinite wisdom when I was bleeding my brakes I accidentally let the reservoir run out of fluid. So, I’ve fully bled the brakes but there are still spongy. So, I’m going to go ahead and do a bench bleed of my master cylinder. I’m going to go ahead and disconnect this right here and then there’s two nuts one in each side against the firewall and then of course this guy is leading in so I’m going to have to get some plugs to plug this up and try to prevent leakage all over the place.

Okay, just got back from the auto parts store and got this nifty little master cylinder bleeding kit. So, I’m going to go ahead and remove this little dude right here and plug him up with here with this little dude right there and hopefully minimize the leakage. All right. Let’s see how that goes.

Okay, step one was not so bad. I spilled a little bit but I kept that rag under there and I don’t think I got really, I don’t think I really got any on the car. You got to be really careful this brake fluid because it’ll just eat paint. So, now I’m gonna go after those firewall nuts and I should be able to break the master cylinder free.

So, these guys are 15s and there’s nothing difficult about them. Okay. It’s been about a minute and this is where we’re at. Just got those lines covered up just in case they leak. And right over here….

Okay, so here’s my master cylinder bench bleed setup. I went two feet on these clear hoses. I would recommend more than two feet. All right. So, this is gonna be a little iffy because I got to hold the camera and these guys may or may not jump out of there but I’m just gonna take the screwdriver here and slowly push and bleed all the air out of the lines.
It doesn’t really seem to be a whole lot of air in the lines which worries me because even after bleeding the brakes I still have a spongy pedal. Although this doesn’t feel like a spongy pedal at all. So, what I’m doing is I’m slowly pushing in and so I could hold this back and do it; it’s hard to do this one handed. You get the picture, we’re just watching the clear lines. The clear lines I had to buy those but they were not available at the auto parts store. But this little bench bleed master cylinder bench bleed kit I was able to get it the auto parts store. So, that proved to be very, very helpful.

Lines are about lose and I’m just going to do this a few more times without the camera in my hand to see if I can make sure I get every bubble out of a line. So, I push on another times or so times, there’s not a single drop air in those lines. So, now I am going to take the whole rig and carefully put it back in the car and we’ll see what happens.

All right. So, that part wasn’t so hard. Now I’ve got to put the hard lines back in the master cylinder. That’s the part that’s going to be a little bit tricky and I’m just going to swap out the lines as quickly as I can, put the cap back on to try to create a vacuum and see how this goes.

Okay, little intermittent step everything’s still same down there, put the cap on here, put a couple plugs in those. So, hopefully I can minimize leakage. Got a bunch of paper towel stuff down in there too. Don’t want paint getting all over the car. All right. Definitely going to need two hands for this maneuver.

Okay, so they’re back on. Now the big lesson learned here is I had tightened down the firewall bolts real tight so I didn’t have a whole lot of play. When I want to go do these hard lines and I couldn’t get them to cooperate. So, my big lesson learned is to not completely tighten down the firewall bolts. That way you’ll have some play back and forth or up and down with the master cylinder, you’ll be able to line these guys up better and get them in because they’re stubborn especially the one in the back here. So, that’s my lessons learned for that one. I fought with it for about 15 minutes and as soon as I tighten it up on the firewall I was able to get it in under a minute or two. So, I hope that helps. But we have bench bled the master cylinder. Now it’s sold all the way up to the top the reservoir and now I’m going to just do a standard, it’s actually a rebleed, I’m going to bleed all four corners and hopefully I won’t have such damn spongy pedal. All right. Onto the next.

All right. So, we’re going to these breaks. We got a little one-man bleeder here so I’m going to do it with a little bit of pressure in the system here. Air up to about 20. I’m going to crack open the line. I’m introducing too many bubbles right here but I read that if you lube up the connection it’ll help to eliminate air getting in there. So, I’m hitting this with some lube and we’ll see how that does it.

Okay. Hit it with lube, try get some pressure, open up the line. All right. So, go ahead and show…..

All right. So, anyhow I’m just gonna continue doing this for a little while. I’ve got to figure out whether I’m introducing air into the line or whether there’s just that much on the line but I’m not going to keep the camera rolling the whole time. Go ahead and kill.

All right. So, we’re at a point now where we are very, very clear fluid and I’m pumping the bubble here and there but we are solid. Not getting any more air in the line at all. So, I am going to go ahead and close off the line.

Okay, so I had to drop the camera to grab the wrench and tighten it up. So, it’s all tightened up and everything would break clean again. And the first one is done, three more to go. I’m not going to record all of the other ones because the process is exactly the same.

So, if you don’t happen to have one of these kits but you do happen to have two people you can have one person pump the brake and have the other person at the caliper opening and closing as the person pumps the brakes and you can bleed it that way.

All right. So, at this point we’ve rebled all the brake lines and we’ve got zero air in the brake lines. So, I am going to go ahead and throw on these tires and take it for e attest bend.

First thought much firmer pedal, the motion is gone so I’m digging that and so all-in all-in conclusion I’m really happy with them. They look good and the pedal’s nice and firm, they stop great. So, this concludes the power stop caliper/rotor/ all that other stuff that I did to the brakes. I definitely think it’s a worthwhile mod especially with the stainless-steel lines and I guess that’s it.

If you liked the videos please definitely subscribe, like, comment, I’ve got so many more videos that I’m hoping to do and someday maybe we’ll even put a supercharger on this bad boy. All right, this is Steve checking out. Have a good one.

Install Y-Pipe Drive Shafts 4L60-E Transmission Chevy Tahoe

Install Y-Pipe Drive Shafts 4L60-E Transmission Chevy Tahoe

Install Transfer Case to 4L60-E Transmission Chevy Tahoe

Install Transfer Case to 4L60-E Transmission Chevy Tahoe

 

Steve

On to the big stuff. From here on out it’s all big bolts and big things. Y pipe baby.

All right. We pulled the trans jack out. It’s being supported by this perfectly measured 2×4 fold it in as if it was across member and there we’re gonna use the transmission jack to bring in Mr. transfer case. All right, that’s good.

Okay. So, we took this part off because I read online that if you drop the transfer case this is the first thing to break and apparently this thing cost a lot of money. So, three big 15 inches and we took it off, cleaned it up, pretty decent and even though the transfer case is not all that pretty it did get somewhat of a cleaning. So, I’m going tp clean this up real good right here and get it really going.

Oh, great.

Robbie

That’s it. All right.

Steve

All right. I wonder if it’ll fit on the car. All right, it fits.

Roy now we’ve got issues, very many issues. All right. Transfer cases get a lot of things to connect to so we’re going to have to figure all that out. So, here we go. You got a connection….

Robbie

Yeah, you need to make this connection….

Steve

A little toofer on the passenger side. You got a toofer in the middle and then coming down all the way on the driver side there’s more and this is where we’re at. We’re basically eye level to where the drive shaft would be, the rear drive shaft. He got your there. But you know what? You get your vent tube for the transmission and that’s really it. So, on the top you got 1, 2 and you want to clip everything all together there there’s clip clips and then I think I just heard her clip one, where did you clip one? More down on the bottom? Show me.

Robbie

Right there.

Steve

All right.

Robbie

And then you have these 2 that go to the…..

Steve

2 that go to the computer and then there’s another one, the vent tube which goes on top somewhere but towards the front above where the computer thing is. All right. We’re done.

All right. Let’s do transfer case. It’s not easy. It’s on, it’s not bolted down yet. But it’s on. So, we need to put that part back on. I don’t know what the hell is but what it does but it needs to go back on. I don’t know what this is, a vent tube I guess. All right, so the vent tube is on right there. See it? Vent tube? All right.

With the 3 bolts, we got that thing back on, trying to figure out what that thing is but it is on and it’s tight. There is a connection there to the computer. I’m calling it a computer thing because I don’t what else to call it and there’s two connections that go to it and then there’s one that goes directly to it. This one had like, I think this had six pins, this had four pins and there was…. 3 of them with two pins: one went up there, one went all the way on the top and one went to the other side and then don’t forget that that tube connects to the top as well. That tube right, there-ish. So, vent tube, that’s the vent tube I guess for the transmission. So, all back in place and tightened up. Don’t forget your gasket obviously and we’re good to go.

Install Torque Converter Bolts, Starter & other 4L60E Transmission Connections

Install Torque Converter Bolts, Starter & other 4L60E Transmission Connections

 

All right. So, next item up for bids is to measure the distance between a flex plate and the torque converter bolt pad. All right. So, make sure it spins freely. It does. Yeah, definitely it spins freely. All right. So, torque converter spins freely. Now we’re going to measure the distance between the flex plate and the torque converter pad and I’ve spared you the time when I do that, I can’t get really anything in there because I’m looking through this little hole here. But what I did was I got my feeler gauge and I put as many of them together as I could to where I could get it all up in there. So, with all those feeler gauges that’s how I was able to get it up in there and if I added one more then I was not able to get it up in there. So, I can either take all of these guys and add them together on a calculator or I can cheat and use this.

All right. Per several sources on the internet say I need to be between 0.60 inches and 0.187 inches and I am at 0.1445. So, I am right in the middle. So, I am happy with that and now I feel at this point that I’m good to go to go ahead and bolt up the torque converter the flex plate.

All right. I’ll have to excuse the loud heater in the background, it’s about 19 degrees outside so. We are looking at [inaudible02:11] shaft bolt, mine is aftermarket stock 27. I don’t remember what the stock was. But I’m gonna go ahead and put my breaker bar on here so I can…. I got to be able to turn the crank so that I can turn the flex plate because the next one to do is do the flex plate to the torque converter bolts. There’s three of them and I put them on finger tight and all three of them make sure everything winds up and then I’m gonna torque them down.

All right. So, I’ve turned the flex plate where I could see the whole and I can reach up through the bell housing and move the torque converter to where I can line up the holes. And there’s the first one, seven to go and put the bolt first one but I’m only doing finger tight.

Okay, so we got all three-flex plate to torque converter bolts in and I got them tightened down and then we use the breaker bar that we had on the [name missed03:23] sharp bolt to let it run a couple rotations to make sure that the torque converter wasn’t rubbing up against anything. If it was at one point I think as we tighten the bolts it pulled the torque converter probably a 16th of an inch or whatever it was away from the back and I don’t think it’s rubbing anymore. No, it’s not rubbing anymore.

All right with the bolts taken care of, all tightened down and nothing rubbing we’re going to turn our attention to the starter and get it back in.

This other big one is another 13. It’s gonna go to the big silver wire and this is an 8mm and it’s gonna go to the black wire underneath there.

All right. Before putting the starter back in make sure you put the crankshaft position sensor back in it’s the purple and white one. Because once you get the starter in here you’re not going to be able to touch that again.

All right. It’s starter time. You can’t put the starter in first because then you’ll never get the plastic thing in. But then you don’t want to bolt down the plastic things because then you can’t get the starter in. So, put on everything loose that way you can move it around and then tighten it up.

Oh. I wasn’t recording at all. All right. We got this back on. There’s a 13 and a 15 and another 13 that hides back there. That 13 was the hardest one. The only way to get to it was with an open-ended wrench. It fought us every step of the way but it’s on and that’s good and then of course don’t forget that one right there. I think that’s a 10 or 8, I forget to get all that wiring lose back together.

All right. This is the fixture straight off of the transmission itself and you can see that that e-clip has three little barbs so that when the flare goes over it, after the fattest part of the flare goes over it should click right into place. So, I am going to go ahead and put this back on the transmission and my flare tip should just click right.

All right. Here’s a couple suggestions that might end up saving you hours. First and foremost, before you do your trans cooling lines that is to say while they are still loose. Do your transmission dipstick. We have to undo the cooler lines to get them out so that we can get the dipstick in. So, you wanna do yourself a favor do the dipstick first, dipstick connects on the bell housing bolt up there, right there that’s the dipstick. Feed the dipstick in through the bottom or at least that’s the way we did it. Make sure you get yourself a new ring. If you cannot for whatever reason make it happen to where you can get the C-clip on there if you fight with it and fight with it and fight with it and fight with it and you can’t get it on or if you get it on and then the flange or the flare of the transmission line won’t seat inside, I took it off, I cleaned it up, I made sure that the C-clip was in it correctly. I taped it up, put it back on, lubed it up, grease and it went in super easy. So, the top on first two because it’s harder and harder to get to that after if you do the bottom and then don’t forget to re-snap these guys back into place. All right. So, that was a much bigger challenge than it needed to be but the transmission coolant lines and that guy are in place.

All right. With our trans dipstick in place and our trans cooler lines in place we’re going to go ahead and just make sure you get this on. I think we did that a long time ago, make sure that guy is on; it’s, the only connection on this side other than the obvious that. Now I’m going to go ahead and put the heat shield back on with just two bolts, very simple, it goes on like that, two bolts. All right. Heat shield, two bolts, very simple, effortless, right Ronnie?

Okay. This is passenger side wheel well. We took this heat shield off earlier so that we could get access to some of the bell housing bolts and stuff like that. But if you by any chance have…. If you by any chance have an awesome 11-year-old around with small hands that makes getting that bolt easy but if you have adult hands probably you won’t be able to get in there without a lot of pain. These two are relatively easy. So, in order to tighten that one down my boy got that one hand tight but now we’re going to use a special tool that I bought precisely for this to get the rest of the way. And these guys are really easy. So, I’m using this tight reach to get that 10 mmm boy up top way up in there. Check it out. Way up there in that corner, in this tight reach. No, my other hand to the socket. You see it down there? All right. So, I’m down here. Now go back up to the other side. You’re only getting the big blue wire. There it is. Look at this thing. All right. Look at that. So, here’s an example of what I was doing. You can back up some. This is how the tight reach works to get up in those tight places and I’m going to use it right here. Otherwise, this is awesome.

So, I took this and I knocked that one position so that I could actually get this on there and it just pops on. And now this right here is in its place and as soon as I just push this forward it’ll pull everything through and now you shouldn’t be able to pull back on it. And now it’s just a matter of putting the safety clip in there to lock it in place. Now this tab can’t get squeezed the other tab can’t get squeezed and it’s locked in a place, I can’t put forward, I can’t pull it back.

 

Installing 4L60-E Transmission in Chevy Tahoe 5.3

Installing 4L60-E Transmission in Chevy Tahoe 5.3

 

Female speaker

Oh hell no.

Steve

Well hold on, you don’t do it alone.

Female speaker

I was trying to just lift my end darling.

Steve

All right. You’re ready?

Female speaker

Yeah.

Steve

1, 2, 3. All right. Okay. All right, plan B, let’s get it out of here.

Female speaker

What’s plan B?

Steve

Get it out of here. Are you ready? All right. Because the scissor jack was so tall we rolled it in, strapped it down a rolled it in on that and now we’ve got to side by side and just slid the transmission from one to the other and it was easy because we had three people, don’t do it alone. But we have three people. It’s not too shabby. So, here goes the transmission, get ready to go in. All right. We got to get a little greased up in the hole. I wonder if you can you see anything or not.

So, we’re gonna start with the transmission connections. I’m trying do them in the reverse order that I’d put them on but I don’t really remember exactly what that was. But I do know that this guy needs to go on here. So, I’ll start with that. So, I can see it or at least access it. I’ll go on there, the vent tube, the vent tube is already on, they are all the way one way on. Get him back to where he was right there. All right. One down, a bunch to go. All right. Now I’m trying to think of things that we can do while it’s on the ground which was all the stuff that was way up top. All right. So, we’ve got this guy right here which goes like this and he goes on like so and there was a heat shield on this side but I think we need to…. I think I need to get the hard transmission lines on before I do the heat shield.

All right, so the first connection that we made was…this is actually an O2 sensor that dangles way down but it goes way up above the transmission. So, we figured we’d take care of it now and it’s just a pretty simple one.

All right. We’ve done our measuring and I saw this little tip on another YouTube video where the guy put on some exhaust studs as a guide for the bell housing. So, I’m going to try the same thing. One above the [inaudible03:53] right there, one above the [inaudible03:55] right there. Hopefully this will help the bell housing on nice and straight.

Yeah, using the jack to get the transmission up into place. So far, the only thing that’s connected is the vent tube.

All right. The recommendation online that was awesome to use studs as guides to get the transmission on. That was the key to getting it on fairly easily. It was a bit of a struggle. The most important thing to remember is all your stuff up top. Just make sure you’re not squishing it or you’re going to want to get all this stuff out of the way so that you’re not squishing it up top. Watch those hard lines up there too. I’m on the driver’s side right now, on the passenger side you’ve also got the transmission coolant lines or the transmission cooler lines so you want to make sure that you’re not pinching those either. So, my recommendation is absolutely under no circumstances do this alone, have a second set of eyes or I think you will go crazy or you’re just really, really that good. If you’re that good then do it alone but even somebody who doesn’t know anything about cars can help you because you can’t see this side and the other side at the same time. So, those around finger type. Let’s see here, I got 6 out of 8 of them on and we’ll go from here.

So, way up there is the top bell housing stud. You need to go with the original stud because the rubber hose vent tubes get attached to it next. And that is number 7 and number 8, I can’t even find number 8 but that’s the top one and we’re using our and wrench to get into it from the side. Allow me to get to where you’re getting to torque it.

So, that’s the top bell housing bolt. That one is not a bolt or at least not on this particular engine. Then you’ve got another one, the 2 and you’ve got the one that holds the third one is also a stud. It’s one of the hardest ones to get to because it’s behind the transmission lines but it’s a stud because it holds the transmission dipstick tube. So, that’s the third one. And then you come down below and you start to get to some of the easier ones. Here’s number 4 at the bottom of the driver side. Yeah, 5, 6, 7. Did I just count 7? There’s an eighth one that we’re missing. I got to find the eight one. I’m at the driver’s side trying to find that eighth one this stupid heat shield is in our way. So, we’re 86ing the heat shield to get better access, to get our fingers on that bolt, that might actually help us with the [inaudible07:47]. So, that heat shield is 3.10 mm and it’s going bye, bye.

[00:07:55] All right. I aint going to lie getting that bracket that holds these vent tubes on the top bell housing boat was a pain in the ass. The only way we were able to do it was to come in from the side. I think I’ve shown you this view before. I’m looking in from the side of the block, on the passenger side with…. let me zoom out, all right zooming out. So, essentially with the wheel off, you can see wheels off taking this plastic wheel well, taking the plastic wheel well thing out made it pretty easy to get right in there. You go past the exhaust manifold. In addition to taking off the wheel well plastic cover thingy I also took off the heat shield and that gives you a whole almost like another inch here which is the difference between making it up here and not making it up here.

So, anyhow that’s how I got to the top bell housing bolt and was able to reach up in there and put that bracket on there and then get the 13 mm knot on there. So, it’s a stud with a 15 min the bracket then a 13mm knot so that’s it. All the bolts are on and we’re off to the next stop.

Prepping 4L60E & Torque Converter for Chevy Tahoe Installation

Prepping 4L60E & Torque Converter for Chevy Tahoe Installation

Prepping 4L60E & Torque Converter for Chevy Tahoe Installation.mp3

Steve

Okay, are we rolling?

Speaker 1

Yes.

Steve

All right. So, we’ve got the 4L60E back from the transmission place and we’ve got it completely rebuilt. It’s rebuilt with Z pack 34 clutches. It’s got a Corvette servo in it, a B sun shell, a 500-boost valve and a BNM shift Kit. Right here we’ve got the new fuse torque converter. The torque converter was selected specifically to go with the cam. Cams got a range of 1000 to 55,00 RPM. This particular talking group got a stall of 18,000. I read online that you want your torque converter to be between 500 and 800 RPMs higher than the bottom range of the cam shaft. So, this was selected specifically to go with my particular cam.

All right. So, I’ll get ready to put this whole thing back together and step one is making sure that we’ve got clean surfaces. So, first thing I’m going to do is I am clean out crankshaft pilot hole, get it super clean. Next thing we’re gonna do is I’m just kind of checking the condition of the flex plate, make sure the flex plate have any cracks in it or anything like that. Make sure it’s not missing any teeth and it seems to be pretty good, pretty good.
I’m sorry. Some of you may have caught that reference but my boy did, my boy caught that reference. All right. So, oh by the way if you’re starting with the flex plate off then make sure that this surface behind this flex plate right here you make that nice and clean too, clean out all the holes and everything like that. This flex plate was just put on like rebuilt the engine so I’m not going to mess with it but it’s in good shape and that is the first part of step one which is getting her clean.

All right. Oh shit. I mean shoot. All right. Another thing I want to do is these dowels, I want them clean, super, super clean. So…. All right. And I’m also going to clean the mating surface on the back of the engine block where the engine block is going to come into contact with the bell housing.

All right our next step was to clean the torque convertor pilot and it’s nice and clean. Next thing we’re going to do is we’re going to measure the circumference of the pilot and it’s coming in at 42.31 and that’s in mm. Can you see all that?

Speaker 1

Yes

Steve

Okay so 42.31. All right. Cut.

Speaker 1

Take two

Steve

Take two. All right. So now we’re going to measure this, oops. We’re going to measure the inner diameter – 42.45. Pretty darn close. All right. So now we know that our torque converter pilot will fit in our crankshaft pilot hole.

All right. So, sorry if I’m squishing it. All right so the next thing to do is just to run a quick test after everything that we’ve done to make sure that it still fits in there. And if I drop this on my head it’s not going to be pretty.

Speaker 1

Please don’t drop it.

Steve

It does fit. Okay. Now….

Speaker 1

Are you going to put it on?

Steve

Keep it on. All right. Now we got to make sure our bolt holes line up. So, Ronnie.

Speaker 1

Yes.

Steve

Ronnie ain’t hard to say. Oh shoot. All right. Let’s get out of here.

All right. Because the torque converter is so heavy and I was not able to lift it up and match it up to the flex plate. We did a mockup of the holes of the torque converter with this piece of cardboard and we identified exactly where the holes are on the torque converter. And now I am…. and now instead of trying to match the torque converter up with the flex plate I’m going to check our little mockup holes against the flex plate and see if we line up. If we do we’ll……I think we’ll have a party. What do you think?

Speaker 1

That sounds good.

Steve

Okay. All right so good. Good?

Speaker 1

Yeah

Steve

Done. All right. So, we took our template and we lined up the top hole and we know this like here is we can see light…. you can see light coming through?

Speaker 1

Yes.

Steve

All right so that one the top hole is good. If you can see light coming through that hole that’s a good sign. And I’ll have to just check this one. Yep. All three of them line up. All right. Cut.

All right, so one thing that we want to do is we’ve got two coolers on this thing: we’ve got a cooler in the radiator and we’ve got a transmission cooler, an exterior transmission cooler. So, we want to get all that bad fluid out of the lines. So, I’ve got a line here which is going to come out and go into our bucket crap and then with line in I’ve got some of this cooler clean. Can you see that cooler clean? Trans flush. So, what we’re gonna do is we’re gonna cook this cooler clean line up to this black line and we’re going to flush all the bad transmission fluid that’s sitting in both coolers right now and get the lines as clean as we possibly can. So, that’s what this is all about. All right. Click.

Speaker 1

Stuff is coming out of the can going through that into the air. Stuff is coming on the red tube, we got fluid.

Steve

That is not it.

Speaker 1

What?

Steve

So, we poured to mush fluid in the torque converter but we found that if we spin the torque converter…. but we found that if we spin the torque converter verb it helps to clink some of that fluid around inside of it and bring it to level so that we can put it on…… Plus my son is having a hell of a good time doing that. travel. Aren’t you? Damn you’re good at that. Where is the fluid now? So, the fluid originally was all way at the top, it was all the way at the top and he’s been spinning it and he got it to go down a good bit. All right try spinning it the other way.

Let’s put you….. put a light in there. Oh yeah. It’s really, really distributing itself good now. All right. Let’s keep trying.

Speaker 1

I like the color.

Steve

It’s red.

Speaker 1

I know.

Steve

All right. Kill the light.

All right so this is a 3M pad, little Bristol pad, I don’t know exactly what it’s called but it’s….. where are you? But it’s safe for aluminum. So, I’m just gonna use it because you can see how bad this looks right here. So, I am going to use it to clean up the bell housing mating surface.

All right. So, we cleaned up the mating surface, the bell housing and we covered everything up with plastic and we blew it out really good to get as much debris out of there as possible. And we’ve already got some grease on the sideline. But here it goes. All right, we should hear three clunks. Okay. I guess that’s one. I guess that’s two. I guess that’s the three, no there is three. Why does it sound like it’s rubbing? You getting all this?

Speaker 1

Yeah.

Steve

That doesn’t sound good. All right go ahead and turn that off. So, the torque converter is scraping against the torque bolts inside and that’s a show stopper. So, all right that’s it.

All right. So, we need to measure the distance between the bell housing mating surface and the pad of the torque converter. So, we’ll do that now. Okay, ready. Okay, we’re 0.96. So, take under an inch, let’s see what that is, 31.30. So, very close to an inch but 31.30 All right. That’s that measurement. Now we have to do the same thing underneath the car for the other one.

All right. This is our B number, the distance between the flex plate and the engine block. That number is 0.8750 All right. So, our A number which was 0.97 something minus our 0.87 and change number is somewhere around point 0.1 which is within our tolerance of…

Speaker 1

0.6 to 0.187.

Steve

0.6 to 0.187. So, by our measures we are good to put the transmission on the car.

 

Remove 4L60-E Transmission 2002 Chevy Tahoe 5.3

Remove 4L60-E Transmission 2002 Chevy Tahoe 5.3

 

Hey everybody, Steve here and today I’m going to take an opportunity to dive back into the car stuff. I got an e-mail from somebody who asked me what the hell the deal was with all this crypto crap that I’ve been doing lately and I haven’t done any car videos lately and the reason for that is because I just haven’t done anything to talk in a while. But he kind of give me an idea and I’m gonna go ahead and steal from that idea and he asked me to do top five. I’ve actually got ideas to do three top five videos. This one here is going to be my top five favorite performance mods and I can also do a video of my top five favorite exterior mods and my top five favorite interior mods. So, let’s just get started.

Okay, so when we’re talking about performance mods obviously we’re talking about things that increase the performance on the vehicle aka horsepower. If you’re just starting out and you want to increase horsepower you may or may not know this but think of your engine as a big air pump. Your engine breathes in air and spews out air through the exhaust. So, the place to start when you start to make mods to your car is with the intake and exhaust. So, number one on the list in terms of bang for your buck horsepower and a great place to start is either a ram air or a cold air intake system. And essentially what this does is it helps your engine to breathe easier, it takes on a whole bunch more air. More air means more power. So, your stock air box on your vehicle is not meant for performance. It’s meant to be nice and quiet and emission friendly and kind to the neighbors. My AEM
brute force air intake was the first mod I ever did to my truck. My truck is a 2002 I think I put that thing on in 2003. So, that was actually the very first mod that I ever did. And then I didn’t do anything for well over a decade. But yeah, I’ll go ahead and do some research and list in the title what the manufacturers say you get in terms of a horsepower gains but an air intake system is the number one place to start increasing horsepower. And I’ll include a list in the description video with some links to all of the things I’m going to talk about in all of these videos for you, make it easier for you.

So, now that you got the car breathing better, get a little bit of a growl a little bit of an attitude, where to go next? Well, the next place to go if you got it breathing-in easier you need to be expelling out easier. And the best place to start with that is a high-performance muffler. And there are plenty of high-performance mufflers out there. You may have heard of Flomax, Borla, Magniflow and the best recommendation that I can give you is go on YouTube or even go to the manufacturer’s site and you can actually listen to what a lot of these things sound like prior to going out and buying one. On my truck, I’ve got a Flow Master 50 series Delta flow which is actually meant for an SUV or a truck. It is in the middle of the road in terms of sound. The Flow Master makes a 40 series and I think a 10 series. 10 series sounds like a flat-out race car. The 40 series is a great car for like all muscle car. On my truck I was really careful because I didn’t want to hear drone at highway speed. That’s just another thing you want to take into consideration is if you go too loud you might have to deal with constant drone inside the cabin while you’re at highway speed. I can say that with my current setup I’m extremely lucky, everything that I did I have no cabin drone and once again mine is a Flow Master 50 series Delta flow muffler for trucks and SUVs.

All right. So, now we’re breathing in better, we’re breathing out better, what to do next in terms of horsepower? Well everybody has an opinion. My channel, my opinion and my opinion is to get a tune, one of those handheld tuners. You can get a hand-held tuner that’s made specifically for your year, make and model of car and essentially it will have a stock mode, it might have a medium mode, it might have an aggressive mode and then for the trucks they also have a torqueing towing mode. The original tuner that I got for my car or my truck rather was Edge Evolution I believe and it didn’t really help. One of the coolest things that I liked about it was it allowed me to change a shift points so the car felt torquier and one of the other things that I liked is I actually kept the car for a long time because it actually has the capability of spinning back. I don’t remember what it was 6 or 12 different gauge parameters on the truck but yeah it really made a difference and I thought it was a great mod. So, you know once you get past intake and exhaust and tuning things we’ll start to get more expensive from there on.

And I know I could go one of a million different ways with this but my fourth favorite mod and absolutely my single favorite mod on the entire vehicle is my long tube headers. My long tube headers made an incredible difference in terms of snap, torado response and the sound is unbelievable. I did a video a long time ago that I’ll linked to in the description a comparison of just the flow master 50 with the exhaust manifolds on and then back to back after I put the long tube headers on the sound before and after and it’s just wow. For my taste not too loud, not too quiet it’s just perfect. It’s borderline obnoxious definitely gets the attention of people as you’re coming down the road but no drone on the highway and it’s not so ridiculously loud that you just make people shake their heads in disgust or maybe it is and I just don’t know it, anyhow, yeah. So, that is my next mod and of course you know it does an unbelievable job at helping to evacuate the exhaust gases and really, really helps that engine to breathe.

So, we’re on number five and I’m really really torn on number five because I want to say cam shaft, do a cam swap. Nothing changes the dynamics of an engine more than a cam swap but I can’t just say cam swap and the reason for that is because when I did my cam swap I mean you got to pull the heads. That is, it is a big, big, big deal to do a cam swap. And the other thing is that when I did a cam swap I actually ended up doing the entire valve train. I did lifters, I did push rods, I did rocker arms and I did springs. So, the cam was awesome. You know the geometry of the lobes on a cam is what if you hear old muscle cars with that real loping [make sounds07:35], that’s the camp and that’s a cam with a lobe separation of probably 114 down to 112. Okay. So, I can’t say cam but I want to say cam. So, we’ll put cam as an honorable mention.

All right. So, my true number five is the brake system that I put on the car. I have 17-inch rims. So, you need at least 18-inch rims to go with big brakes. So, I didn’t go with big brakes and you know what? To get some wild woods or some [name missed08:05] or something like that you’re looking at a $1,000 per corner at least. For around $650 I got the power stop extremes, I think they’re called power stop extremes. I was able to get pads, rotors and calipers all the way around. It’s those red powder coated calipers that are so cool, all the way around for less than I think $650 or something like that and the truck stops on a dime. So, if you add a whole bunch of horsepower to the truck you probably want to add some stopping power to the truck. So, yeah. So, that’s pretty much my top five for…. my top five mods that I’ve done to the truck.

So that’s it. I’m going to wrap it up there five favorite mods: intake, exhaust, tune, long tube headers, brakes and then the honorable mention, the cam just because it’s just so awesome. So, anyhow hope you enjoyed it. My name’s Steve, more car videos to come and I’ll interrupt the car videos with some of my other passions which is the crypto mining stuff and some of the other stuff that I’ve been blogging about but all my car videos can be found on funcarstuf.com and I also segregate all my videos based on playlists. So, if you’re only interested in the car videos you can check out the car videos; if you’re only interested in the mining videos you can check those out and although I haven’t in a while I do a lot of WordPress videos. So, my channel is just that, it’s a channel it’s got different shows on it. So, watch the shows that you like and all the shows that you don’t like. But please like, subscribe, comment ,stick around many, many, many more videos to come. Thanks for watching.

Remove Transfer Case & Connections – Transmission Removal Chevy Tahoe

Remove Transfer Case & Connections – Transmission Removal Chevy Tahoe

 

I’m Selling off my Johnny Lightning & Custom Car Key chains to fund more fun car stuff

 

Yep, after 15 years, I’m Selling off my Johnny Lightning & Custom Car Key chains to fund more fun car stuff.  Exciting things are coming to my YouTube channel and this website.  I’m cleaning house and selling off my little treasures to fund a new lift and some other really exciting mods to the Tahoe, the Colorado, and who knows what else.

So up for grabs are 100’s, possibly 100’s of my Johnny Lightning mint in box and custom car keychains.  Check out THE STORE for a start to the sell off.  If you don’t see what you want, let me know via the form, and I will hunt around to try to find it for you.

CLICK HERE TO CHECK OUT THE STORE

 

 

Remove Starter Flexplate Torque Converter Bolts & Crossmember – Transmission Removal Chevy Tahoe

In order to get the transmission out of your GM truck, you are going to need to get the starter out of your way. It’s only 2 bolts, but they might be a bit tricky. You will also need to get a couple of sensors disconnected and out of the way as well. Then there’s the oil dipstick which will probably be in the way as well.

The bottom of the bellhousing has a plastic cover you can remove so you can mark the flexplate and the torque converter to make sure you put them back in the same way. With the starter out of the way, you get access to the 3 bolts holding the flexplate to the torque converter. You may have to spin the crank to see one. This means you may have to pull the bottom rock guard out of your way. My car now has aftermarket e fans so I did not have to remove the fans shrouds and mechanical fan but you may have to to turn the crank.

With all 3 flexplate to torque converter bolts done, its time to turn our attention to the transmission crossmember. In addition to the 4 massive bolts you can see, there are 2 more nuts inside the transmission crossmember holding it up. Once it’s out of your way, you can push and pull and tug the y-pipe out of there and get it out of your way. Enjoy the video for all the details!